Itinerary | 10 Nights - Iceland & Greenland Cruise

COVID-19 Update Information



10 Nights - Iceland & Greenland Cruise

from $1323 pp

Aquafest Hosted Group of LGBT Travelers

Departs from Reykjavik, Iceland on June 23, 2023 returning July 03, 2023

Norwegian Cruise Line - Norwegian Star

Departing roundtrip from Reykjavik. Visiting Djupivogur, Akureyri, Isafjordur, Nanortalik, Paamuit, Nuuk with 3 days at sea.

Aquafest Does Not Accept Electronic Transmission of Credit Cards.

Day
Ports of Call
Arrival
Departure
Day:1
Port:Reykjavik, Iceland
Arrival:---
Departure:4:00 PM

Reykjavik, Iceland

The fire, frost and water symbolized by the red, white and blue of Iceland’s flag are manifested in this northern land. The country is located so far north that parts of it touch the Arctic Circle where ice and snow defy penetration by modern civilization. Volcanoes on occasion spew forth rivers of glowing lava. Yet Iceland’s name is something of a misnomer; thick tundra and mountain flowers cover the country in the summer, when warm ocean currents produce a climate similar to that of the northern United States.

As living evidence of the expanding Atlantic Rift, 20-million-year-old Iceland widens almost an inch a year. Great rifts, boiling water and new earth are the results of this creative process. The island was inhabited briefly during the 8th century by Irish hermits; permanent settlement began in 874 when a Norwegian named Ingolf Arnarson arrived at present-day Reykjavik. In 930, the settlers formed a legislature, the Althing, creating the Commonwealth of Iceland.

From the 10th to the 14th centuries, Iceland developed a literary form, the Icelandic Saga, which spread throughout the Nordic culture and into the English and German languages. It was used to spin stories of the gods, record historic events and glorify heroes.

Reykjavik, or Smoky Bay, was so named in 874 A.D. by Ingolf Arnarson when he sighted the numerous hot springs on the Seltjarnarnes Peninsula. He built a cabin here 900 years before Reykjavik was incorporated. Today this remarkably pollution-free city on Faxa Bay is a major seaport, the capital of Iceland and home to about half of the country’s 270,000 people. Wrapped around a sweeping bay, Reykjavik has managed to retain its charming Old-World atmosphere. A pastiche of red-blue-and green-roofed houses together with the tall gray tower of Hallgrim’s Church dominate the skyline. In the Old Town, many of the wooden buildings have been lovingly restored and stand side by side with modern timber and concrete structures. Few chimneys are seen as heat is almost exclusively supplied by steam piped from the nearby hot springs.

There are fine museums and art galleries; historic pubs present a hub of activity in late afternoon. The unusual, beautiful countryside outside of Reykjavik includes such natural wonders as volcanoes, geysers, glaciers, mountains and spectacular waterfalls.

Day:2
Port:Djupivogur, Iceland
Arrival:11:00 AM
Departure:7:00 PM

Djupivogur, Iceland

Djupivogur is a small town and municipality located on a peninsula in the Austurland region in eastern Iceland, near the island of Papey and on the fjord Berufjorour. The municipality was formed by the merger of rural communities Berunes, Buland, and Geithellur on October 1, 1992.

Day:3
Port:Akurevri, Iceland
Arrival:10:00 AM
Departure:8:00 PM

Akurevri, Iceland

The town of Akureyri, with its population of approximately 16,000 Inhabitants, is the administrative, transportation and commercial center of North Iceland. The mountains surrounding the fjord, which Akureyri is in the bottom of, is called Eyjafjordur. It is the longest fjord in Iceland, or 60 km, the fjord that all ships have to go through, on the way to Akureyri. Akureyri has provided rural communities in these high latitudes with sundry services as well as educational and industrial facilities. Akureyri has its own theater, symphony orchestra, University and one of the biggest hospitals in the country that serves as well East part of Greenland.

Day:4
Port:Isafjordur, Iceland
Arrival:7:00 AM
Departure:3:00 PM

Isafjordur, Iceland

Isafjordur (ice fjord in Icelandic) is the capital of the Westfjords region of Iceland. With a population of about 3,000, Isafjordur is the largest town in the Westfjords. It is located on a spit of sand, or eyri, in the Skutulsfjordur fjord which meets the waters of the larger Isafjordur fjord.

The town is connected via road to Bolungarva­k which lies 15 km to the northwest of Isafjordur, and to the small town of Sudavik to the east. The one-lane Vestfirair Tunnel, completed in 1996, leads to the small towns Flateyri and Sudureyri, as well as the more southern parts of the Westfjords. Isafjordur also has an airport with regular flights to Reykjava­k.

Fishing has been the main industry in Isafjordur, and the town has one of the largest fisheries in Iceland. A vast decline in the fishing industry, due to many reasons such as political fishing restrictions in the early eighties and natural causes, has lead the inhabitants to seek work elsewhere making the population numbers decreasing with every year. There is also an electronics company based in the town which is related to the fishing industry. The harbor also serves ferries to nearby settlements as well as larger cruise ships for tourists visiting the area.

The town has a rather urban atmosphere despite its small number of inhabitants. Isafjordur has a school of music as well as a hospital. The older former hospital building now accommodates a cultural center with a library and showrooms. In the Adalstraeti (main street) is the art gallery Slunkariki, where international works are shown, as well as those by Icelandic artists.

Day:5
Port:At Sea
Arrival:---
Departure:---

At Sea

Enjoy the whole day at sea.

Day:6
Port:Nanortalik, Greenland
Arrival:10:00 AM
Departure:8:00 PM

Nanortalik, Greenland

Nanortalik, formerly Nennortalik, is a town in Nanortalik Island, Kujalleq municipality, southern Greenland. With 1,185 inhabitants as of 2020, it is the eleventh-largest town in the country. The name Nanortalik means "Place of Polar Bears" or "Place Where the Polar Bears Go".

Day:7
Port:Paamuit (frederikshab), Greenland
Arrival:8:00 AM
Departure:7:00 PM

Paamuit (frederikshab), Greenland

Paamiut, formerly Frederikshab, is a town in southwestern Greenland in the Sermersooq municipality.

Day:8
Port:Nuuk, Greenland
Arrival:6:00 AM
Departure:5:00 PM

Nuuk, Greenland

Nuuk, Greenland's capital, is a small city on the country's southwest coast. Its large fjord system is known for waterfalls, humpback whales and icebergs. The waterfront is dotted with brightly colored houses against the backdrop of Sermitsiaq mountain. Greenland National Museum has mummies and Inuit skin boats, while the Nuuk Art Museum displays local works. The Katuaq cultural center offers films, concerts and art.

Day:9
Port:At Sea
Arrival:---
Departure:---

At Sea

Enjoy the whole day at sea.

Day:10
Port:At Sea
Arrival:---
Departure:---

At Sea

Enjoy the whole day at sea.

Day:11
Port:Reykjavik, Iceland
Arrival:7:00 AM
Departure:---

Reykjavik, Iceland

The fire, frost and water symbolized by the red, white and blue of Iceland’s flag are manifested in this northern land. The country is located so far north that parts of it touch the Arctic Circle where ice and snow defy penetration by modern civilization. Volcanoes on occasion spew forth rivers of glowing lava. Yet Iceland’s name is something of a misnomer; thick tundra and mountain flowers cover the country in the summer, when warm ocean currents produce a climate similar to that of the northern United States.

As living evidence of the expanding Atlantic Rift, 20-million-year-old Iceland widens almost an inch a year. Great rifts, boiling water and new earth are the results of this creative process. The island was inhabited briefly during the 8th century by Irish hermits; permanent settlement began in 874 when a Norwegian named Ingolf Arnarson arrived at present-day Reykjavik. In 930, the settlers formed a legislature, the Althing, creating the Commonwealth of Iceland.

From the 10th to the 14th centuries, Iceland developed a literary form, the Icelandic Saga, which spread throughout the Nordic culture and into the English and German languages. It was used to spin stories of the gods, record historic events and glorify heroes.

Reykjavik, or Smoky Bay, was so named in 874 A.D. by Ingolf Arnarson when he sighted the numerous hot springs on the Seltjarnarnes Peninsula. He built a cabin here 900 years before Reykjavik was incorporated. Today this remarkably pollution-free city on Faxa Bay is a major seaport, the capital of Iceland and home to about half of the country’s 270,000 people. Wrapped around a sweeping bay, Reykjavik has managed to retain its charming Old-World atmosphere. A pastiche of red-blue-and green-roofed houses together with the tall gray tower of Hallgrim’s Church dominate the skyline. In the Old Town, many of the wooden buildings have been lovingly restored and stand side by side with modern timber and concrete structures. Few chimneys are seen as heat is almost exclusively supplied by steam piped from the nearby hot springs.

There are fine museums and art galleries; historic pubs present a hub of activity in late afternoon. The unusual, beautiful countryside outside of Reykjavik includes such natural wonders as volcanoes, geysers, glaciers, mountains and spectacular waterfalls.

Disclaimer: All advertised events are exclusive to guests who book through Aquafest only. Aquafest Cruises are group events and not chartered vessels. All rates are cruise only and per person, based on double occupancy subject to availability at time of booking. Non-discountable fees and taxes, airfare, air taxes and transfers are additional. Events based on a minimum of 50 group passengers. Pricing and other information may change without notice. We reserve the right to correct errors. Information and pricing are subject to change without notice. All cancellations are subject to a $50 per booking cancellation fee from Aquafest in addition to any vendor cancellation penalties. Trip Cancellation Insurance is strongly recommended for all reservations. More information will be provided to you at the time of booking confirmation. Please contact us for a more detailed description of restrictions, cancellations, and penalties.

Cancellation Policy:
• 119-91 days prior to sailing 25% of Gross Fare
• 90-61 days prior to sailing 50% of Gross Fare
• 60-31 days prior to sailing 75% of Gross Fare
• 30 days or less 100% of Gross Fare